1. Overview
  2. What is IST?
  3. Life in IST
  4. Cooperative Experience
  5. Financial Aid
  1. Undergraduate
  2. Undergraduate Experience
  3. BS in IT
    1. Overview
    2. Courses
    3. Handbook (PDF)
  4. BS in NSA
    1. Overview
    2. Courses
    3. Handbook (PDF)
  5. Minors
  6. Adv. Placement / Placement Exams
  1. Graduate
  2. Graduate Experience
  3. MS in IST
    1. Overview
    2. Courses
    3. Handbook (PDF)
  4. MS in NSA
    1. Overview
    2. Courses
    3. Handbook (PDF)
  5. MS in HCI
    1. Overview
    2. Courses
    3. Handbook (PDF)
  6. Advanced Certificates
  7. General Information
    1. Admission Requirements
    2. Financial Information
    3. Application Timelines
    4. Debbie Cahn Scholarship
    5. MS Capstone Information

Bachelor's in I.T.

Be One with IT.

Ask 10 people to define IT, and you'll get 20 different answers. Because IT has gained widespread use in so many different contexts, it is hard to nail down a single definition, so we'll give you two. Big IT and Little IT.

Big IT refers to the computing world as a whole. Little IT is an academic discipline that looks at IT in its many forms and applications. Our program is concerned with Little IT. It consists of five key areas, which we call...

The Five Pillars of IT

In order to “make things work” for people in today’s (and tomorrow’s) sophisticated computing environments, IT Professionals need core competencies in five essential areas:

  • Programming and application development
  • Web and mobile development
  • Database management systems and applications
  • Networking and system administration
  • User-centered design and deployment, and human-computer interaction.

The fifth pillar focuses on the human element. This is the defining competency of the IT professional; what distinguishes us from, for example, a computer scientist. To be successful users’ advocates, we must see the world through their eyes. We must “be one” with our users, and learn about the tasks they perform and the skills they possess. From this, we can then select, integrate and deploy technology that enhances their lives. This requires skills in information gathering, user-centered design, and deployment. It also attracts the student who cares more about how people use computers than about how computers work under the hood. Creativity, technology, and communication skills—these are the core competencies of IT.

Many students in our BS in IT program focus on one or two technical aspects that prepare them for careers in a variety of market niches like enterprise systems, web applications, or database management to name a very few of the many possibilities. Other students choose a broader path to prepare for “general practitioner” or “Jack of all trades” jobs that are prevalent in virtually every enterprise and organization. In short, the IT program at RIT offers the opportunity to specialize, but does not require that you do so. Whatever you want IT to be, IT will be.

Program Goals

  • Graduates of the BS/IT program will be employable as IT professionals, able to secure positions primarily in (but not limited to) business and industry.
  • Graduates of the BS/IT program will have appropriate foundational skills so that they may be lifelong learners in the IT field.
  • Graduates of the BS/IT program will be prepared to work as team members and to rise to positions of leadership as necessary.
  • Graduates of the BS/IT program will be prepared for further academic study and will be able to make contributions to the growing discipline of Information Technology.